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Thu, May 25, 2017

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New technology and operational efficiencies help easyJet reduce emissions below 80 grams per passenger/km | easyJet
New technology and operational efficiencies help easyJet reduce emissions below 80 grams per passenger/km
Tue 23 May 2017 - Fuel efficiency gains at Europe's second-largest airline easyJet have resulted in carbon emissions per passenger kilometre falling below 80 grams for the first time and are on track to be reduced by a third in 20 years, it says. The low-cost carrier attributes the milestone to improving technology and a continued long-term focus on reducing weight and improving operating efficiency. Since it began reporting on carbon emissions in 2000, easyJet's emissions have reduced from 116.2 grams to 79.98 grams - a reduction of 31 per cent. It is now targeting a further reduction to around 77 grams by 2020 as new Airbus A320neo aircraft join the fleet.  Read more ...

Hawaiian celebrates "100 Percent Day" as it passes milestone to reduce APU usage | Hawaiian Airlines
Hawaiian celebrates "100 Percent Day" as it passes milestone to reduce APU usage
Tue 23 May 2017 - Hawaiian Airlines has achieved a key fuel and carbon emissions objective of having all its wide-body aircraft arriving at airports on a single day to be connected with electrical power at the gate. In the past year, the carrier has been working towards a goal of having gate power available to its entire wide-body fleet within three minutes of arrival as aircraft fly between Hawaii, 11 US cities and 10 international destinations. Through significantly reducing usage of onboard auxiliary power units (APUs) by an estimated 30 minutes a flight, Hawaiian estimates it could save around 620,000 gallons of fuel annually and cut CO2 emissions by 5,933 tonnes - roughly enough fuel to fly the airline's wide-body fleet for a day. Read more ...

JetBlue's carbon emissions show 8 per cent growth last year but improvement in fuel efficiency performance | JetBlue
JetBlue's carbon emissions show 8 per cent growth last year but improvement in fuel efficiency performance
Fri 5 May 2017 - Carbon emissions from operations by US carrier JetBlue amounted to just under 7.5 million tonnes in 2016, an increasing of 8.4 per cent compared to the previous year as a result of higher passenger volume that saw revenue passenger miles rise by 9.3 per cent. Also contributing to the emissions increase, says JetBlue in its latest annual sustainability report, was a change in physical operating conditions as a result of congested airspace in the Northeast region of the United States causing increased fuel burn from occasional longer taxi times at airports. While emissions increased overall, however, the airline says its greenhouse gas intensity decreased by 0.62 per cent on the previous year and 4.9 per cent since its 2008 baseline reporting year. To meet CO2 reduction targets, JetBlue has set goals to save 500,000 gallons of fuel burn per year through enhanced technology, integrating biofuel into all flight operations and transitioning its airport ground equipment to all-electric where feasible. (Updated 15 MayRead more ...

Singapore Airlines aims to adopt regular usage of sustainable fuels as it starts first in a series of biofuel flights | ASPIRE,Singapore Airlines
Singapore Airlines aims to adopt regular usage of sustainable fuels as it starts first in a series of biofuel flights
Wed 3 May 2017 - Singapore Airlines has undertaken its first sustainable biofuel flight as part of a series of 12 'green package' flights over a three-month period on the non-stop San Francisco to Singapore route. Operating its latest-generation and most fuel-efficient aircraft - the Airbus A350-900 - the airline claims the series of flights are the first in the world to combine the use of biofuels, fuel-efficient aircraft and optimised flight operations. The biofuel for the SQ31 flight is produced by AltAir Fuels from used cooking oil and supplied by SkyNRG in cooperation with North American Fuel Corporation (NAFCO), a wholly-owned subsidiary of China Aviation Oil (Singapore) and EPIC Fuels. The Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS) is facilitating the use of the optimised flight operations and air traffic management (ATM) best practices to reduce the fuel burn and carbon emissions from the flights. Read more ...

LAX and Gatwick step up recycling efforts with initiatives to turn airport waste into energy | Los Angeles International Airport,Gatwick Airport,recycling
LAX and Gatwick step up recycling efforts with initiatives to turn airport waste into energy
Tue 2 May 2017 - Los Angeles International (LAX) and London Gatwick airports have started recycling initiatives to turn waste into either natural gas fuel or onsite energy use. In partnership with the Los Angeles Bureau of Sanitation (LASAN), LAX is beginning a 90-day pilot programme involving the collection of food waste from a targeted sample of airports restaurants and concessionaires, which will then be transported offsite for conversion into natural gas using an anaerobic digestion process. Solid and liquid organic waste that cannot be converted into methane gas will be converted into commercial-grade fertiliser. Gatwick Airport and DHL Supply Chain, meanwhile, have opened a new waste management plant, which they claim makes the airport the first in the world to turn both food and packaging waste into energy onsite. Read more ...

JetBlue and Boeing see exciting future in passenger hybrid-electric aircraft and invest in start-up Zunum | Zunum Aero,Wright Electric,Airbus E-Fan,Boeing HorizonX
JetBlue and Boeing see exciting future in passenger hybrid-electric aircraft and invest in start-up Zunum
Fri 28 Apr 2017 - US carrier JetBlue and Boeing are to back start-up Zunum Aero, which is developing regional hybrid-electric aircraft that could be flying as early as the 2020s. Hybrid aircraft could revolutionise the regional airline market, say the partners, by bringing about cheaper, faster and more environmentally-friendly air travel between regional airports. Both Boeing and Airbus are already working on the concept themselves but the technology breakthrough is dependent on major advances in battery power, as well as aircraft and engine design. Initially, Zunum is planning a small capacity aircraft with a range of 700 miles but by 2030 it expects to be producing aircraft accommodating up to 50 passengers and capable of flying over 1,000 miles. Another US start-up, Wright Electric, also has ambitions to come up with an electric passenger aircraft within the next 10 years and is being supported by UK budget airline easyJet. Read more ...
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ACI Asia-Pacific recognises airports in the region for their environmental and carbon reduction achievements | ACI Asia-Pacific,Green Airport Recognition
ACI Asia-Pacific recognises airports in the region for their environmental and carbon reduction achievements
Fri 28 Apr 2017 - The inaugural annual Green Airports Recognitions were presented during this year's ACI Asia-Pacific Regional Assembly held recently in Doha, Qatar, with Platinum recognitions going to Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA) and Darwin International Airport. ACI Asia-Pacific stresses these are not competitive awards but are recognition of environmental projects undertaken by airports large and small in the region. The objective is to promote environmental best practice and recognise outstanding accomplishments. Understanding that different airports have different environmental priorities, each year a specific environmental aspect will be chosen as the recognition theme. This year's theme was energy management. Also during the Assembly, 11 airports in the region were presented with their Airport Carbon Accreditation certificates to recognise their initiatives and achievements in carbon reduction. Read more ...

Air Canada and NRC start research into biofuel impact on contrail formation from commercial flight operations | Air Canada,NRC
Air Canada and NRC start research into biofuel impact on contrail formation from commercial flight operations
Tue 25 Apr 2017 - Five Air Canada biofuel-powered flights between Montreal and Toronto over the coming days will be trailed by a National Research Council of Canada (NRC) T-33 research jet using advanced sensing equipment to sample and test the contrail biofuel emissions from each aircraft. It is part of the Civil Aviation Alternative Fuel Contrail and Emissions Research (CAAFCER) project led by NRC that is studying the environmental benefits of biofuel use on contrails. Depending on suitable weather conditions required for the testing, the first of the flights could take place today. The sustainable biofuel has been produced by AltAir Fuels from used cooking oil and supplied by SkyNRG. NRC has already taken part in extensive trials of a NASA-led project in the United States to measure the impact of alternative fuels on contrails, details of which were recently published in the journal Nature. The results showed using biofuels could substantially decrease jet engine exhaust particles and so reduce climate-warming contrails. Read more ...

CORSIA aviation carbon emissions scheme must learn lessons from UN's flawed offset mechanism, says study | Oeko,Stockholm Environment Institute
CORSIA aviation carbon emissions scheme must learn lessons from UN's flawed offset mechanism, says study
Tue 25 Apr 2017 - While ICAO deliberates over rules concerning what offsets should be eligible under its carbon scheme for international aviation, a study prepared for the European Commission concludes the UN's Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) has fundamental flaws in terms of overall environmental integrity. An offset mechanism established under the Kyoto Protocol to contribute to GHG mitigation, the CDM will end in 2020 - just as the ICAO CORSIA scheme gets underway - and a future design is required under the successor Paris Agreement. The fundamental principle that only real, measurable and additional emission reductions are generated, has not been adequately followed in most of the projects covered by the CDM, finds the study by Oeko-Institut. Lessons should be learned and applied to other crediting mechanisms like CORSIA, it advises. NGOs, meanwhile, say ICAO runs the risk of repeating the mistakes and the aviation sector should not rely on offsetting to address aircraft emissions. Read more ...

Incidents of severe aircraft turbulence likely to multiply as a result of climate change, finds study | Paul Williams,University of Reading,turbulence
Incidents of severe aircraft turbulence likely to multiply as a result of climate change, finds study
Wed 12 Apr 2017 - Incidents of severe aircraft turbulence on transatlantic routes are likely to become twice or even three times more common as a result of climate change, finds a new study from the Department of Meteorology at the University of Reading in the UK. The study used supercomputer simulations of the atmosphere to calculate how wintertime transatlantic clear-air turbulence would change at an aircraft's cruising altitude of around 39,000 feet (12 km) in response to a doubling in the concentration of CO2 levels in the atmosphere, which scientists predict will occur later this century. The results show the average amount of light turbulence increasing by 59 per cent, rising to 149 per cent for severe turbulence. A significant number of injuries to passengers and crew already take place each year, as well as damage to aircraft, and the study concludes an intensification of clear-air turbulence could have important consequences for aviation. Read more ...

Swedish project looks to narrow the emissions reporting gap between estimated and actual flight paths | LFV,Swedish Transport Agency,FOI
Swedish project looks to narrow the emissions reporting gap between estimated and actual flight paths
Tue 11 Apr 2017 - Until now, calculating emissions from aircraft in Sweden has assumed airlines take the straightest and shortest routes, despite this not being the usual case in real-world conditions. A collaboration involving the Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), the Swedish Transport Agency and Sweden's air navigation service provider LFV is now trying to narrow the gap between estimated and actual flight paths. The project has involved FOI, a leading defence and security research institute that also studies the environmental impact of aircraft, accessing LFV's radar tracks from 2,200 domestic flights during a few weeks in 2016. By studying the radar tracks, FOI has been able to refine its calculation model and bring down the difference by around 8 per cent. LFV said the outcome could lead to lower fuel consumption and a reduced climate impact from the aviation sector. Read more ...