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Wed, Aug 16, 2017

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New UK aviation strategy must address the sector's environmental impact, pledges government | Airline Operators Association,Airlines UK,Sustainable Aviation,AEF
New UK aviation strategy must address the sector's environmental impact, pledges government
Mon 24 July 2017 - The UK government has opened an eighteen-month consultation into the long-term future of aviation in the UK and has pledged that any new strategy must address the impact of the sector on local communities and the environment. Transport Secretary Chris Grayling said a vision was required that looked beyond a new runway at Heathrow, and a thriving sector would be central to the UK's future prosperity in a post-Brexit world. In the wide-ranging consultation into the technological, security, environmental and passenger service challenges ahead, the government is also looking for views on possible new forms of compensation for noise or designing targets for noise reduction. Meanwhile, Heathrow Airport has announced 700 local homes most affected by aircraft noise will be offered bespoke noise insulation free of charge. Read more ...

Report identifies mechanisms to fund uptake and deployment of sustainable aviation fuels at Seattle-Tacoma | Port of Seattle,Seattle-Tacoma International,Carbon War Room,SkyNRG
Report identifies mechanisms to fund uptake and deployment of sustainable aviation fuels at Seattle-Tacoma
Fri 21 July 2017 - Although the premium has come down considerably since their introduction in 2008, the current cost of sustainable aviation fuels is still around three times higher than conventional fossil-based jet fuels and has been an important factor in their slow take-up and large-scale production. Airports such as Seattle-Tacoma International, however, are keen to supply their airline customers with a reliable and regular supply of sustainable advanced fuels as they could provide important environmental and economic benefits far into the future. Airports are at the supply-chain intersection of airlines, fuel suppliers, governments and communities, and can leverage their position in supporting scale-up. To bridge the price premium gap, the Carbon War Room and SkyNRG have worked with the Port of Seattle to produce a report to assess and recommend potential long-term funding mechanisms that could supply all airlines at the airport. Read more ...

Second generation transport biofuels can play a significant role in meeting UK carbon reduction targets, says report | Royal Academy of Engineering,UK biofuels
Second generation transport biofuels can play a significant role in meeting UK carbon reduction targets, says report
Thu 20 July 2017 - A viable second generation liquid biofuel industry and market has a significant role in helping to meet UK long-term carbon reduction goals, particularly in sectors like aviation where alternative low-carbon options are not available. So concludes a report by the Royal Academy of Engineering commissioned by the UK's transport and energy government departments, DfT and BEIS. Aviation - along with shipping and heavy goods vehicles - should be considered a priority for the development and use of biofuels, it recommends. While there has been growth in the contribution of biofuels to road transport in the UK under the government's Renewable Fuels Transport Obligation (RTFO), although production has stagnated over the past eight years, little progress has been made in aviation and even less in shipping. An immediate priority, says the Academy, is for government to incentivise the development of second generation biofuels such as those derived from wastes and agricultural, forest and sawmill residues. Read more ...

Future airline and airport disruption likely as a warming climate makes it harder for aircraft to take off | Ethan Coffel,Radley Horton,Columbia University,Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory,Paul Williams
Future airline and airport disruption likely as a warming climate makes it harder for aircraft to take off
Tue 18 July 2017 - Rising temperatures as a result of global climate change will make it harder over the coming decades for aircraft to take off at certain airports, finds a Columbia University study published in the journal Climatic Change. Since 1980, average global temperatures have gone up nearly 1 degree C and this may already be having an effect. Last month, American Airlines cancelled over 40 flights out of Phoenix when daytime temperatures reached nearly 120 degrees F (49 degrees C) as smaller regional aircraft are only tested up to 118 degrees F. As air warms, it spreads out and its density declines, and in thinner air, wings generate less lift as a plane races along a runway, explain the researchers. A packed plane may therefore be unable to take off safely so weight must either be dumped or the flight delayed or cancelled.  Read more ...

ENVI MEPs back continuation of EU ETS ‘stop the clock’ until 2020 pending ICAO CORSIA outcome | ENVI,Julie Girling,Peter Liese,Seb Dance
ENVI MEPs back continuation of EU ETS ‘stop the clock’ until 2020 pending ICAO CORSIA outcome
Thu 13 July 2017 - Members of the European Parliament's environment committee (ENVI) have unanimously backed a proposal for continuing with the exclusion of CO2 emissions from intercontinental flights from the EU ETS, but only until 2020. The 'stop the clock' derogation, which limits the scope of the trading scheme to intra-EEA flights, automatically ended in December 2016 and requires new legislation to extend it. The issue will come before a full plenary in September, followed by trilogue talks with the Council. The derogation was agreed to allow negotiations to continue at ICAO on the global CORSIA carbon offsetting scheme to start in 2021 but ENVI MEPs want to see the final details before agreeing to yet a further extension. They also proposed the rules be tightened on aviation's participation in the EU ETS from 2021 to bring it into line with other industrial sectors. Read more ...

Lufthansa Group stalls on annual fuel efficiency improvement for the second year running | Lufthansa
Lufthansa Group stalls on annual fuel efficiency improvement for the second year running
Tue 11 July 2017 - For the second year running, Europe's largest airline group, Lufthansa, failed to improve the overall fuel efficiency of its fleet, citing a decline in the passenger load factor by 1.4 per cent and the negative effects of "geopolitical developments" and changing passenger reservation patterns caused by strikes. The group also says new, more fuel-efficient aircraft did not arrive early enough in the reporting year to make a contribution to lowering fuel consumption. The Group's fuel efficiency averaged 3.85 litres per 100 passenger-kilometres (l/100pkm) in 2016 compared to 3.84 l/100pkm in 2015 and 2014, with fuel consumption rising 1.2 per cent in 2016, from nearly 28.2 million tonnes of CO2 to just over 28.5 million tonnes. SWISS, which flies predominantly long- and medium-haul routes, was the best performer in the Group with a specific fuel consumption of 3.44 l/100pkm. Read more ...