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LFV introduces new airspace system that will allow straighter routes and reduced emissions over Sweden

LFV introduces new airspace system that will allow straighter routes and reduced emissions over Sweden | LFV, Sweden

(photo: LFV)
Thu 9 Apr 2009 – From today, certain flight routes over Sweden will be straighter as a result of a new system called Free Route Airspace Sweden (FRAS), which is being introduced for a trial period of two years. FRAS will allow flights cruising above flight level 285 (about 9,000 metres) and north of the 61st parallel to choose their own routes. Air navigation service provider LFV says that as a result, CO2 emissions are expected to be reduced by around 17,000 tonnes per year.
 
“When fully introduced in 2011 we expect airlines to save about 10 flying hours per day and with each hour costing airlines about SEK100,000 ($12,000), total daily savings will be in the region of SEK1 million ($120,000),” said Kenneth Johansson, Manager, Business En Route, at the LFV Group.
 
According to calculations, CO2 emissions from the most common type of aircraft, the Boeing 737-600, will be reduced by 5.8 tonnes per flying hour when using the system.
 
Initially, 30 flights per day will be involved and will be followed by a second stage in which the trial area will be extended to cover the entire Swedish airspace above flight level 285. A third stage will follow in 2010, which will also include all take-offs and landings north of the 61st parallel, before culminating in a fourth and final stage in 2011 involving all traffic using the airspace above flight level 285.
 
By 2012, LFV says that 8 out of 10 flights in Swedish airspace will have the opportunity of choosing straighter flight routes.
 
 
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